RobHeartsDH
January 11, 2011
Category: Politics

A new poll found that "55% of all LGBT adults, when asked if they 'personally care a great deal about the current state and future of the environment,' say this statement describes themselves completely or very well - a description that characterizes just one-third (33%) of heterosexual American adult."

I guess it makes sense that gays and lesbians are more likely to go green than our hetero counterparts. We do tend to be early adopters when it comes to social causes and technologies. But "being green" seems to more of a trend/label than an actual practice these days, and that kind of scares me.

Do you find yourselves trying to do the right thing by the environment or do you get tired of it's recent exploitation?

P.S. For those of you wondering about sexy scuba man, he's Phillipe Coustea, Jr., grandson of Jacques-Yves Cousteau and son of Phillipe Cousteau. He's been continuing his family's work of educating the public about environmental and conservation issues and looking good while doing it.

RobHeartsDH
November 30, 2010
Category: Politics
Pentagon Releases DADT Study Results

As it turns out, we won't set off a giant glitter bomb if gays are allowed to serve openly in the military. So says the finally release pentagon report which also dismisses stereotypes about gays trying to check out each others junk in the shower. Looks like all those 'predatory gay' scare tactics used by the right really don't hold much weight.

Here's a summary of the result via ThinkProgress:

- 70% of Service members said they would be able to “work together to get the job done” with a gay servicemember in their immediate units.

- 69% said they worked in a unit with a co-worker that they believed to be homosexual.

- 92% stated that their unit’s “ability to work together,” with a gay person was “very good, “good” or “neither good nor poor.” (89% for those in Army combat arms units, 84% for those in Marine combat arms units.)

- 74% of spouses of military service-members say repeal of DADT would have no impact on their view of whether their husbands or wives should continue to serve.

- 30% overall (and 40–60% in the Marine Corps and in various combat arms specialties) expressed negative views or concerns about the impact of a repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.

Does this mean that a repeal isn't far off? Seems like there's not much more to argue about at this point, but you never know when it comes to bias.

Here's hoping though.

To read the full report (all 267 pages of it), click...

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RobHeartsDH
November 30, 2010
Category: Politics
Pentagon Releases DADT Study Results

As it turns out, we won't set off a giant glitter bomb if gays are allowed to serve openly in the military. So says the finally release pentagon report which also dismisses stereotypes about gays trying to check out each others junk in the shower. Looks like all those 'predatory gay' scare tactics used by the right really don't hold much weight.

Here's a summary of the result via ThinkProgress:

- 70% of Service members said they would be able to “work together to get the job done” with a gay servicemember in their immediate units.

- 69% said they worked in a unit with a co-worker that they believed to be homosexual.

- 92% stated that their unit’s “ability to work together,” with a gay person was “very good, “good” or “neither good nor poor.” (89% for those in Army combat arms units, 84% for those in Marine combat arms units.)

- 74% of spouses of military service-members say repeal of DADT would have no impact on their view of whether their husbands or wives should continue to serve.

- 30% overall (and 40–60% in the Marine Corps and in various combat arms specialties) expressed negative views or concerns about the impact of a repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.

Does this mean that a repeal isn't far off? Seems like there's not much more to argue about at this point, but you never know when it comes to bias.

Here's hoping though.

To read the full report (all 267 pages of it), click...

Read more
RobHeartsDH
October 12, 2010
Category: Politics

Looks like a lone judge has done what Obama and Congress have been unable to do. U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillip's issued an injunction today that would stop enforcement of the now 17-year-old 'don't ask, don't tell' policy. The U.S. Department of Justice can of course appeal the ruling (they have 60 days to do so), but they're also under no obligation to.

Here's hoping Obama and Co.'s egos don't get in the way and let this stand. Obama has been a champion of having Congress resolve the issue, but with the possible change over in party seats the odds of that happening could get even slimmer.

Let's all give a big army salute to Judge Phillips today.

New York Times Article


gay personals


July 9, 2010
Category: Politics

Originally Posted via the New York Times :

"A federal judge in Massachusetts found Thursday that a law barring the federal government from recognizing same-sex marriage is unconstitutional, ruling that gay and lesbian couples deserve the same federal benefits as heterosexual couples.

Judge Joseph L. Tauro of United States District Court in Boston sided with the plaintiffs in two separate cases brought by the state attorney general and a gay rights group.

Although legal experts disagreed over how the rulings would fare on appeal, the judge’s decisions were nonetheless sure to further inflame the nationwide debate over same-sex marriage and gay rights.


If the rulings find their way to the Supreme Court and are upheld there, they will put same-sex marriage within the constitutional realm of protection, just as interracial marriage has been for decades. Seeking that protection is at the heart of both the Massachusetts cases and a federal case pending in California over the legality of that state’s ban on same-sex marriage..."

Read the full article at the New York Times

Cyrus
May 20, 2009
Category: Politics

I have watched this entire Miss California episode with equal moments of disbelief, disgust, and complete disinterest, but now my over-stimulated media-hijacked brain is thinking something quite different.  That this means something… this is important.

Unless you don’t follow gay, or any, news at all, you know that the runner up to the Miss U.S.A. pageant, Carrie Prejean, recently may have lost due to an answer she gave celebrity blogger Perez Hilton regarding her beliefs/stance/opinion regarding gay marriage.  She went biblical, Perez went ape shit, and what should have been a thirty second piece on Access Hollywood has turned into a media, and now cultural, firestorm.  She has now completely overshadowed the winner by surfing her polarizing answer through the choppy media waters, making a connection with the National Organization for Marriage (who already had their own problems), and has now come under fire from the Miss California Organization who thought her communication breakdown with them was a little too biting the hand that feeds and blew the whistle that yep, they paid for her Miss U.S.A competing fake breasts.  And then the nudie pics surfaced.

I’ve followed the whole sordid tale and have read a LOT of opinions on the whole topic.   Who is hurting gay marriage equality more, Carrie Prejean or Perez Hilton?  How unfortunate that a nasty blow-hard like Hilton is the spokesperson for us and this important human rights issue.  How this is a free speech issue, shouldn’t she have the...

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Walter Smith
January 8, 2009
Category: Politics

A recent study has shown that African-Americans in California were far less supportive of proposition 8 -- which banned gay marriage in California in Novemer - than originally believed, but still more supportive than several other groups.

The study by Patrick J. Egan, Ph.D., assistant professor of politics and public policy at New York University, and Kenneth Sherrill, Ph.D., professor of political science at Hunter College, CUNY, under the auspices of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Policy Institute shows that while exit polls indicated Black voters supported Prop 8 by nearly 70 percent, they in fact supported it by about 58 percent.

The study looked at pre- and post-election polls and conducted a sophisticated analysis of precinct-level voting data from five California counties with the highest African-American populations (Alameda (Oakland), Los Angeles, Sacramento, San Diego and San Francisco). Based on this, it concludes that the level of African-American support for Proposition 8 was in the range of 57-59 percent.

Egan said, "Party identification, age, religiosity and political view had much bigger effects than race, gender or having gay and lesbian family and friends."

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, "...support among blacks is still well above the 52 percent Prop. 8 received from all voters in the...

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Walter Smith
January 3, 2009
Category: Politics

New laws passed in Australia in November mean widows of war veterans in that Country can apply for pension benefits. The new laws come as a result of a ruling by the United Nations' Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights in the case of Edward Young of Australia.

According to an article in The Age, Young's partner of 38 years, Larry Cains, served in the Australian Army in Borneo during World War II. The two met in London in 1960 when Cains was a photographer and Young a model.  "He was desperately handsome," Young said, "we spent two weeks together and I told him I wanted to spend my life with him."


Edward Young  Photo: Peter Rae/ The Age

Young's battle began 10 years ago with the death of his partner.  Young applied for the pension only to be told that he and Cains were not a legally recognized couple under the Veteran's Entitlement Act.  The UN court ruled in his favor in 2003, saying Australia breached the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, but the government of then Prime Minister John Howard held out on reviewing Mr. Young's case.

A spokeswoman for Veteran's Affiars said the new law will come into effect on July 1 of this year and...

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Walter Smith
January 2, 2009
Category: Politics

Edwin Cameron, openly gay and HIV positive, has been appointed as a judge to the Constitutional Court of South Africa, the highest court in that Nation.   Judge Cameron becomes the first openly gay man or woman ever appointed to any nation's highest court.  The appointment came from South African President Mothlanthe on Wednesday.

A former Rhodes Scholar and human rights lawyer, Judge Cameron is the co-author of several books, including Witness to AIDS, a memoir on his experiences as a person living with AIDS.

Last summer, Judge Cameron addressed the International AIDS Conference in Mexico, arguing that homosexual sexual conduct should be decriminalized throughout the world, as a necessary step in fighting AIDS.  He elaborated the argument in a scholarly paper co-authored withwith Scott Burris.

We're always thrilled here at DaddyHunt when another mature gay man opens a new door for the rest of us.  Let's hope we see more gay men and women leading our world courts (and legistures and countries) soon.

...

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M. Christian
December 20, 2008
Category: Politics

Editor's Note: As we get nearer to Christmas day, we thought we'd look at things to be grateful for this year and say thanks.

It might be his age -- after all the General is getting to be well into his warm daddy-ness -- or it could be his happiness to finally be looking at an administration that understands (finally) that sexual orientation has nothing to do with a person's ability to serve in the armed forces, but Colin Powell has stepped into the spotlight to openly say the the U.S. Congress should re-evaluate "Don't Ask, Don't Tell."

We need more leadership like this in our Country and so to you, General, we say: "Thank you, Sir!"